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was elected in june, coming out of the muslim brotherhood party, there were a lot of concerns in the u.s. about the direction of egypt as an ally, whether they would be a reliable partner in the kinds of negotiations that we just saw this past week. morsi seems to have walked a very fine line, but so far succeeded. on the one hand he acted as a proxy for hamas in the peace talks with the united states, and on the other hand. he -- egypt and morsi stood by their 30-year peace agreement with israel, and it's a balancing account for president morsi. and president obama praised him for being pragmatic and helping to get this deal done. >> actually, i have to go real quick. but jonathan, you said you were a bit pessimistic about israel and gaza, figuring it out. do you think this is a good start? >> this is actually like a really surprisingly good sign that he would be the -- play this role. just to underscore this, he hasn't named israel -- he hasn't referred to it by name since he took office. >> andy kroll, jonathan strong, thanks for coming in. appreciate it. >> thank you. >>> the timing
cease-fire between israel and hamas militants brokered by the u.s. government and egyptian president morsi. it is less than 24 hours old. there is deep mistrust. civilians on both sides hoping the agreement will bring a permanent end to the deadly air strikes and rocket fire. in gaza with the i have latest, eamon, good morning. >> reporter: good morning. for the first time in nine days the people of gaza were able to go about their business as usual in a place that usually is not very normal. so, for the first time they were able to wake up today after cease-fire declared last evening and shops and stores reopened people going back to their homes. throughout this conflict 9,000 or so palestinians were displaced from their homes. they took up shelters in u.n. schools. today for the first time able to go back, survey damage in some of the areas and try to get their lives back to normal. in gaza city, tens of thousands of supporters of hamas and other palestinian factions that have been fighting over the past nine days came out to the streets in what is described as a victory rally. the
, this was an all-important test of u.s.-egyptians relations following the arab spring. what's the grade? >> well, the grade is good. better than good. you have to be cautious, of course. you're talking about the middle east. but i think that it's remarkable, alex, really, to see the kind of praise that president morsi is receiving. even in those defiant speeches that ayman was referring to, hamas leaders, islamic jihad leaders, benjamin netanyahu's comments last night, secretary clinton's comments last night, president obama's praise, everybody has good things to say about morsi, who has now emerged not only as a can-do politician, but a power broker in the region. for instance, when the truce deal needed to be closed and clinton came to cairo, she spent hours with morsi and with his foreign minister, mohammed kamul, finding the compromise that israel and hamas could live with. mainly stop the hostilities today and negotiate the other demands later. alex? >> jim, thank you very much for that live report from cairo with the latest on the brokering of the truce. joining me now, former u.s. ambassa
are watching some major developments at the u.s. supreme court where the nine justices are behind closed doors considering whether to take up cases that will impact same-sex marriage in america. ten marriage equality cases are on the high court's menu. eight of them deal with the federal defense of marriage act, or doma. joining me now is chris geidner. the man who knows the supreme court inside and out, pete williams. pete, good to have you with us. break it down. which cases are we talking about, and how quickly might we find out whether they will move forward? >> reporter: well, if they're going to take any of these cases, thomas, it's very likely we'll find out this afternoon. and i think the most likely event here is that they will grant one of the cases that challenges the federal defense of marriage act. passed in 1966 by congress signed by president clinton, it defines marriage as for federal law purposes as only the legal union of one man and one woman. now, the practical effect of that is that in the nine states that now grant or soon will grant same-sex couples the legal right to ge
, we're talking about what the u.s. gives, $2 billion annually, the imf has $4.8 billion in the reserve fund to help egypt and senator lindsey graham over the weekend was very forceful saying we are watching you. they know full well that aid will be cut off if they don't act accordingly trying to broker a peace deal, correct? >> i would say it's more than just trying to broker a peace deal. i think it's fulfilling its obligations. in the first sense its international obligations. one thing the president morsi understood is if hamas continued to do what it was doing and if the pressures on him led to him breaking the peace treaty with israel, then it wasn't just american assistance that would be put at risk. it would be all the assistance internationally. all the investment egypt would need. so he's putting egypt's needs first and foremost and that suggests that actually the economic imperfect it tiff is trumping the ideological imperatives and that's actually a positive sign for the future. >> with hillary clinton going to the region and with these positive signs that morsi has already
. now to egypt where the country's new president is winning big-time praise from the u.s. for helping to broker the cease. jim is joining us from cairo. this was seen as a test of the relations following the arab spring, so how did it do? >> reporter: morsi has passed the test as ayman and martin suggested, this is the middle east and there's not a lot of optimism. we'll see how morsi chooses. there may be a moment of truth where he has to decide between hamas or with the truce. we don't know how he'll do that or which way he'll go, but so far it's pretty amazing to see this man who was not even a muslim brotherhood's main candidate for president. he was the backup plan now receiving the praises of everyone yesterday from hamas to benjamin netanyahu, clinton, president obama, everyone had good things to say about morsi who is emerging as a pragmatic guy and politician but as a regional star. hillary clinton spent hours with morsi and his foreign minister talking about stopping the hostilities and negotiating everything else later. this time with morsi as the mediator, today in "the ne
of israel. the united states gives $3 billion a year in u.s. taxpayer money to israel in addition to weapons, in addition to political support. if we're going to be serious about moving forward, the role has to come from the united states, pressure from the united states. it's not enough to demand that it come from egypt. >> diana buttu, many thanks for your time. we appreciate it. >> my pleasure. >>> back in the u.s., get ou of the way because black friday is here. people spend long hours in line to score major deals this morning. >> it's affordable right now even if you have to be out here for two days to get it. >> it saves a lot of money like a few hundred dollars. >> cnbc's courtney reagan is in dayton, ohio. how is it going so far out there? >> reporter: you know, so far it looks pretty good out here, alex. this mall in particular about did open at midnight. they saw a lot of traffic in the beginning. a lull after the people got what they wanted with the door busters. it's really picking up again here right now and you would never know that it's so early in the morning. it feels like t
and the police, that took place outside the u.s. embassy. riot police there fired tear gas and rubber bullets to try to keep the crowds at bay. one of the central issues of the protesters behind me is that since the end of the revolution, egypt's police force has not been reformed. many of the senior officers are still in positions of power that has led to them continuing many of the brutal tactics that they used under the mubarak era. and today, the people behind me have gathered demanding a few important changes. one, they want president morsi to rescind the decree that he issued on thursday that gave him absolute powers, but more importantly, they want egypt's constitutional assembly. they want writing a new constitution to be more inclusive and reflect egypt's pluralistic viewpoints. the people behind me are the opposition. they have been dormant, haven't been unified. today, many of egypt's more powerful, secular liberal opposition forces have united for the first time. these numbers are unprecedented for them. and i think they are sending from what they're telling me, at least, they're
for a global perspective is former united states senator george mitchell who served as the u.s. special envoy for middle east peace from 2009 to 2011. sir, welcome. we are awfully glad to have you here. let's talk about egyptian president mohammed morsi who played the critical role. he is facing protests in his own country because he's trying to expand and have further reaching powers. do you see this as a power grab? that he's riding on something of a success? >> churchill once said democracy is the worst possible form of government except for anything else that's been tried by human beings. as senate majority leader, faced with constant delay, frustration, filibustering, i often thought, boy, i would like to be king for a day and cut through all of this. democracy is tough. it's messy and morsi is finding that out. i don't think that what he did was right, and i don't think it will hold. >> with regard to what he's doing now by ordering some retrials in terms of hosni mubarak and his cabinet, what might that do to the situation there? do you worry that would have inflaming factions there? >
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9